Mayor Russ Brewster


MAYOR RUSS BREWSTER
Russ Brewster was first appointed as Mayor in November 2021, following more than a decade of service on the  Town CouncilPlanning and Zoning (P&Z) Commission, and the Zoning Board of Adjustments and Appeal (ZBA).

If you have an interest in requesting a meeting with, a call from, or attendance at an event by the Mayor, Mayor Pro Tem, or a Councilmember, you can email them directly or coordinate through the City Secretary's Office via email or by calling 817-617-3706.

RUSSELL "RUSS" BREWSTER was elected to Place 4 in May 2010 after previously serving on the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) and the Planning and Zoning (P&Z) Commission. He is honored, as Mayor, to represent the Town that his family has called home for more than two decades. Russ is an avid outdoorsman and enjoys fishing, hunting, softball, and coaching baseball — but family always comes first! He and Jackie have been married for thirty years and plan on a long future ahead in Pantego. They have two adult children and one grandson.


Roles and Responsibilities 

The Mayor occupies the highest elective office in municipal government. Responsibilities include providing leadership and direction for the organization (elected, appointed, and professional staff), presiding over Council meetings, serving as a signatory for the Town, and representing the Town at both official and social events. As very few mayoral powers are prescribed by state law, most are created through Ordinances and Resolutions adopted by the Council.

The Mayor’s most important duty is to carry out the legislative responsibilities he or she shares with other members of the Council — identifying the needs of the Town, developing programs to satisfy those needs, and offering services that satisfactorily reflect the policy goals of the Council. As the presiding officer, the Mayor’s actual powers in legislative matters can be greater than those of other Councilmembers. The Mayor can influence the flow of debate and rules on questions of procedure during meetings. Though the Mayor is allowed to vote only in the event of a tie, he or she can formally object to the adoption of an Ordinance or Resolution by the Council. If the mayor objects before the fourth day after passage, it must be reconsidered by the governing body. If approved upon reconsideration, it becomes effective.